Quotes

Meeting survivors of the Holocaust, like Sylvia Guttman, whose parents were gassed in Auschwitz, particularly touched me. I was moved by her
courage and bravery in sharing her story with us and in educating others about the Holocaust …
JULIET KARUGAHE, RWANDAN


The March of Remembrance and Hope is an outstanding educational experience that profoundly emphasizes the common humanity we all share and the priceless dignity we all deserve. Only by honoring the memory of the victims of the Holocaust, and by understanding the roots of prejudice - in others and ourselves — and seeing its catastrophic results, can we hope to build a better world for all.
DR. LOIS SCULCO, S. C. ADMINISTRATOR,
NATIONAL CATHOLIC CENTER FOR HOLOCAUST EDUCATION
V.P. FOR ADMINISTRATION AND STUDENT LIFE, SETON HILL UNIVERSITY


Thanks for guiding us to see a side of history in a new perspective; this was truly rewarding … it is imperative that we all follow one agenda; to make the world as humane and peaceful as possible, let us stand together and proudly say “keep hope alive. …
POLISH UNIVERSITY STUDENT


The March of The Living offers a wonderful opportunity to study the Holocaust and its legacy in the 21st century. Follow-up meetings and online
discussion enable participants to continue their learning and sustain friendships made during the march. The experience is transformative!
DR. MARY JOHNSON PHD, NATIONAL SENIOR
PROGRAM ASSOCIATE, FACING HISTORY AND OURSELVES


What I saw and heard in Poland during the March was so transformative that I still have a difficult time finding words to describe it.
PROF. THEODORE PULCINI, DICKINSON COLLEGE


The trip turned out to be as much thought-provoking as it was emotionally draining. I came face-to-face with the utter fragility and the extraordinary resilience of the human being. I experienced the ease with which human beings are able to demonize and dehumanize other human beings…and then…after going through such horrid and hideous experiences… I witnessed the victims' ability to not only continue to exist…but also to create dynamic communities.

The trip to Poland ... forced us all to transcend our religious ... political ... and cultural boundaries in order to bear witness to the common humanity we all share ... the common humanity that speaks in the language of life and death ... hope and despair ... joy and pain ... acceptance and alienation ... This common humanity is what should unite us when injustice is inflicted upon any one of us ... on the basis of these differences. This is not to eradicate the differences ... but to transcend them when there is a need to embrace a higher ideal.
AYESHA SIDDIQUA CHAUDHRY, MUSLIM CANADIAN


The trip to Poland has been an experience that I shall never forget. Now I understand more clearly the role that we need to play in educating our families and our perspectives communities on the highly relevant and pressing issues on racism and anti-Semitism that occurred and continue to occur in this world we live in.

"Never Again" is a mission that has become the passion of my life. occurred and continue to occur in this world we live in."

"We must teach children to value life, their own and others, and to pass on these values to future generations."
THIERRY KAGUBARI, RWANDAN CANADIAN


I felt a deep sense of loss in Poland; a loss in humanity for the sacredness of life. My faith in the human race deteriorated a little more with each death camp we visited. [But] my deep sense of loss was accompanied by something greater; something that restored my faith. It was accompanied by hope [which I found] in my fellow participants. Each of my companions has a gift of giving me the ability to attempt to make a difference. .......The camp [Auschwitz-Birkenau] that was once run by savage murderers was now over come by people who condemned such acts of evil. This gave me hope that one day we shall overcome. I hope that it does the same for you.
TRISHA LYNN COWIE, IRISH-OJIBWAY CANADIAN


The most transformative moments of my trip were those spent with people who endured the horrors of the Holocaust. The survivors' passion and drive were unlike those I've ever encountered in any other human beings.... Without the slightest sign of fatigue, they shared with us deeply personal stories with universal implications about human suffering, perseverance, and heroism.

One moment.... left a particularly lasting impression on me, took place at the closing ceremony in Birkenau. Against the backdrop of barbed wire fences and ruins of crematoria, the survivors were getting ready to light the candles for Kaddish. Each stepped forward and read out the names of his or her family members who perished at the hands of the Nazis. One woman approached the microphone but was unable to speak. She stood in front of us and cried. Another survivor came up to her and said, "Wait, don't cry. Look! Look at them! They are here for you!" She was right. I looked around me and I realised that with me were hundreds of young people who wanted to learn, who wanted to remember, who wanted to prevent things like this from happening in the future. I gained hope by listening to them and by sharing with them my own fears and insecurities. I came to realise that this is the only route to hope. We must listen; we must welcome opportunities to become exposed to other cultures and to other peoples; and we must educate each other. Hope can only be realised through mutual understanding. Only through such an understanding can we promote knowledge and diminish hatred. And then maybe, just maybe, will we be able to say "never again"."
BART BONIKOWSKI, POLISH CANADIAN

 

 

Bart Bonikowski
Trisha Lynn Cowie
Thierry Kagubarispch
Ayesha Siddiqua Chaudhry

 

 

 

 
 
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